amastyleinsider

July 27, 2011

Abbreviation Nation

Filed under: abbreviations,editing process,usage — amastyleinsider @ 11:28 am
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Of the reference books I use while editing the Archives journals, my favorite by far is MEDical ABBREViations: 28,000 Conveniences at the Expense of Communication and Safety, 13th Edition, by Neil M. Davis. Not only does it have the most wonderfully snarky title I’ve ever seen on a reference book, but it is the Great Decoder, the book that allows me to make sense of the myriad abbreviations I run across in my daily work.

As much as we are a nation of people who speak largely in cliches and mixed metaphors (I will save my rant about the overused and incorrect “magic bullet” for another day), we are a nation of overabbreviators. The number of organizations that are known by their abbreviation are too many to quantify (NFL, AMA, NORAD). We put out APBs, send out CVs, take our OTC meds, surf our Macs and PCs, and occasionally go AWOL. But when you think about it, do these mean anything? A National Football League is a thing. An NFL is not. What about an AC? Is it an air conditioner? An alternating current? Atlantic City? Though sometimes context can tell us what an abbreviation means, just as often it cannot, and it’s my job to sort these out.

As someone who previously tried to argue that texting is a valid and efficient method of communicating, it may seem hypocritical for me to do a mental fist pump every time I read Mr Davis’ snappy title, but I do. It’s because for every abbreviation that I find easily in my AMA Manual of Style or my MED ABBREV, there are so many that I must ask authors about. This worries me, because I don’t think authors would put these in their articles if they weren’t  routinely used. And though they and their colleagues and most of the American medical community may know exactly what they mean, will readers in Zimbabwe, Thailand, or Argentina? Those readers may have their own set of metaphors, jargon, and abbreviations that makes perfect sense to them. Or they may be students who don’t come across them every day. What happens when we let them slide, or when a journal doesn’t have finicky, know-it-all editors to question them? I worry that it will make journals less accessible, and that it will make medical discourse less accessible. I hate the idea of a medical student somewhere in the world not being able to use one of our articles in his research because I didn’t feel like finding out what something means. And believe me, sometimes I don’t feel like it. But I know I must be persistent, as annoying as it feels to harass a busy professional about something that seems so trivial. And that medical student out there better appreciate it.—Roya Khatiblou, MA

4 Comments »

  1. Thanks for providing another value resource for my reference shelf!

    Comment by Mary Ann Branagan — July 28, 2011 @ 9:24 am | Reply

  2. Good news! There is a newer edition of the great reference book that you mentioned: MEDical ABBREViations: 32,000 Conveniences at the Expense of Communication and Safety, 15th edition; http://www.amazon.com/Medi​cal-Abbreviations-Convenie​nces-Expense-Communication​/dp/0931431158/

    Comment by Katharine O'Moore-Klopf — July 28, 2011 @ 10:31 am | Reply

  3. While “Mac” and “PC” are undeniably abbreviations, I’m not sure that expanding them would be helpful. Would anyone who doesn’t know what a Mac is know what a Macintosh is? And “personal computer” is a very broad and general term that could certainly include Macs, whereas “PC” has come to mean (as I understand it), any system running some version of a Microsoft Windows operating system–or, even more generally–”not a Mac.”

    Comment by Suzanne S. Barnhill — August 4, 2011 @ 7:44 am | Reply

  4. [...] Very true. We certainly all embrace alphabet soup. While I agree that texting is a valid and efficient method of communicating, it will create more and more challenges for the future of the writing and editing fields. Of the reference books I use while editing the Archives journals, my favorite by far is MEDical ABBREViations: 28,000 Conveniences at the Expense of Communication and Safety, 13th Edition, by Neil M. Davis. Not only does it have the most wonderfully snarky title I’ve ever seen on a reference book, but it is the Great Decoder, the book that allows me to make sense of the myriad abbreviations I run across in my daily work. As much as we are a natio … Read More [...]

    Pingback by Abbreviation Nation (via amastyleinsider) « rite2communicate — August 18, 2011 @ 4:21 pm | Reply


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